Culture, Sponsored Post

Scott Anderson: Lawrence In Arabia, Tomorrow at the Ivy Bookshop

0 Written by: | Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 4:30pm

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Scott Anderson: Lawrence In Arabia

The Ivy Bookshop

Wednesday, June 11, 2014 – 7:00pm

Scott Anderson discusses the roles of four men – including T.E. Lawrence – in the shaping of the modern Middle East.

Description:

The Arab Revolt against the Turks in World War I was, in the words of T.E. Lawrence, “a sideshow of a sideshow.” Amidst the slaughter in European trenches, the Western combatants paid scant attention to the Middle Eastern theater. As a result, the conflict was shaped to a remarkable degree by a small handful of adventurers and low-level officers far removed from the corridors of power.

Curt Prufer was an effete academic attached to the German embassy in Cairo, whose clandestine role was to foment Islamic jihad against British rule. Aaron Aaronsohn was a renowned agronomist and committed Zionist who gained the trust of the Ottoman governor of Syria. William Yale was the fallen scion of the American aristocracy, who traveled the Ottoman Empire on behalf of Standard Oil, dissembling to the Turks in order to gain valuable oil concessions. At the center of it all was Lawrence. In early 1914 he was an archaeologist excavating ruins in the sands of Syria; by 1917 he was the most romantic figure of World War I, battling both the enemy and his own government to bring about the vision he had for the Arab people.

The intertwined paths of these four men – the schemes they put in place, the battles they fought, the betrayals they endured and committed – mirror the grandeur, intrigue and tragedy of the war in the desert. Based on years of intensive primary document research, Lawrence in Arabia definitively overturns received wisdom on how the modern Middle East was formed.

Scott Anderson is a veteran war correspondent who has reported from Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Northern Ireland, Chechnya, Sudan, Bosnia, El Salvador and many other strife-torn countries. A contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, his work has also appeared in Vanity Fair, Esquire, Harper’s and Outside. He is the author of the novelsMoonlight Hotel and Triage and of nonfiction books The Man Who Tried to Save the World and The 4 O’Clock Murders, and co-author of War Zones and Inside the League with his brother Jon Lee Anderson. Anderson lives in upstate New York with his wife, the filmmaker Nanette Burstein.

Featured, Lifeline, My Real Life Modern Family

The Rucksack: What One Woman Carried to War

17 Written by: | Wednesday, Mar 12, 2014 11:12am

image via female-soldier.com

image via female-soldier.com

University of Baltimore MFA student Lisa M. Van Wormer recounts poetically the contents of her rucksack when she served one long year in the Gulf region–the list of items will surprise you.

One knotted ball of light brown hair ties

One of the many challenges of being a woman in the Army was that your hair always had to be regulation: either cut into a bob that did not touch your collar or pulled back into a tight bun. Even in a sandstorm, even under a Velcro-strapped Kevlar helmet, perfection was required. Many of my fellow female soldiers had tools to make this magic occur: hair-colored bobby pins, hair bands with no metal on them that would blend in with a natural hair color (as stated in Army Regulation 670-1), gel and smoothers, even a sock cuff to pull off the “perfect bun” look. I knotted my thick, wavy red hair tightly each morning and always had my cargo pockets full of hair ties as close to my color as I could find, but inevitably by midday wisps would become unruly and slip out of ranks. Read More →

Featured, Real Estate & Home, Roland Park

Neighborhood Rebranding – Smart PR or Fool’s Errand?

3 Written by: | Tuesday, May 28, 2013 10:04am

around-eager-park-master-plan

Last month, we posted about a classic rowhouse in Roland Park — and received a slew of comments from folks objecting to the neighborhood designation. (The house was at 39th St. and Beech Ave., which is technically a part of the Roland Park Historic District, but more closely associated with Hampden, according to our intrepid readers.) And remember when some folks tried to rechristen beloved Pigtown as blander-but-more-expensive-sounding “Washington Village”? Now you can add another neighborhood rebranding effort to the list:  The East Baltimore neighborhood known as Middle East is being referred to as “Eager Park” in new marketing materials — and the renaming attempt is making some residents hopping mad.
Read More →

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